Click here to find out which long German words are Guinness World Record breakers and which one involves this very famous European river! As a rule, multi-syllabic masculine or neuter nouns take an ending of "-s": (des Computers), The grammar-police find that appalling, but in fact the dative is actually the older form. Here are the the ways in which the three genders and their plurals are indicated as being in the genitive case: Note that the possessive adjectives (mein, dein, sein, ihr, etc.) Note that in English the so-called "possessive pronouns" ("my", "his", "her", "whose" etc.) In English, we use the "apostrophe s" or prepositions to do this. Its main function is to show possession similar to the English 's or the preposition of. Notice the additional -s at the end of 'Mädchen'. It is almost completely replaced by the dative case in everyday speech & writing. German has four cases: nominative, accusative, dative and genitive. (i.e., when there is no article), there is no genitive "-s": Less frequently used are außerhalb [outside of], innerhalb [inside of], oberhalb [above], unterhalb [beneath], With weak nouns the accusative and the dative are usually identical with the genitive — but not always. nevertheless pronounced as a separate syllable: "-es". In English, we use the "apostrophe s" or prepositions to do this. Das Gehalt einer Mitarbeiterin (The salary of a female employee). 'A girl' is in this case as she possesses the dog. Both masculine and neuter singular nouns also It is certainly used less than one or two centuries ago, but it still occupies an important position. The genitive case ( 2. Lesson Summary. Increasingly, writers' manuals call for an "-'s" in those cases as well ("Louis's book"), It is almost completely replaced by the dative case in everyday speech & writing. 'My son' is in this case as he 'possesses' the girlfriend. In the genitive, there is no distinction between a "der-word" and an "ein-word."1. The "ein-words" are ein, kein, and the possessive pronouns: mein, dein, sein, ihr, unser, euer, Ihr, ihr. Notice the additional -s at the end of 'Lehrer'. The genitive case is used to denote ownership. 2.) 'The teacher' is in this case as he possesses the book. while one-syllable nouns take an "-es": (des Mannes) — although colloquial speech will sometime add just -s). Return from the Genitive Case in German to German Grammar Return from the Genitive Case in German to Learn German Homepage. The genitive case has four functions. Fall/Wessen-Fall in German) indicates possession. Some examples: Again: note that all of these nouns are masculine. Furthermore, their plural forms are the same as their accusative, dative, and genitive singular forms: e.g.. Notice how in all three of these tables the possesser always follows that which is possessed. Definite articles change their form in this case to the following: Das Buch des Lehrers (The teacher's book). The genitive is used to indicate an indefinite day or part of the day: Although Nacht is feminine, it here - and only here - assumes an analogous structure: German speakers can also use prepositions and frequently do so for spoken language. When just a masculine or neuter noun follows the preposition The genitive personal pronouns are rare nowadays, but they do exist (some further examples of their use can be found below): The third-person demonstrative pronouns, on the other hand, are commonly employed: In ambiguous situations, the demonstrative possessive pronoun points to the nearest preceding (i.e. The most common are statt and anstatt [instead of], trotz [in spite of], wegen [because of] and während [during]. nominative, accusative, (or in a plural that already ends in "-s", with just the apostrophe): statt dessen [instead of that], and trotz dessen [despite that] - written as one or two words. Its main function is to show possession similar to the English 's or the preposition of. and dative cases, infolge [as a result of; owing to], ungeachtet [despite; notwithstanding], etc. Noun as genitive attribution. Definite articles in the genitive case (i.e. We can use the question wessen (whose) to find the genitive case in German. The German genitive case is the case that shows possession and is expressed in English by the possessive "of" or an apostrophe ('s). Er entschuldigte sich immer wieder wegen seines schlechten Deutsch. There is a special form of wegen: Quite a few verbs once took a genitive object, but over time they have switched to the accusative. Meine Brüder und deren Kinder sind schon angekommen. Similarly, an -s or -es is added to nouns to mark the genitive case in German grammar. Genitive case signals a relationship of possession or “belonging to.” An example translation of this case into English might be from das Buch des Mannes to “the man’s book” or “the book of the man.” In English, possession is usually shown by either an ending (apostrophe + s) or with the preposition “of.” In German, the genitive case is primarily recognized from article forms and sometimes … are not genitive in and of themselves. Ein Teil unseres Hauses (A part of our house). Are you the man's wife? How can I identify the genitive case in German? Page description: The genitive case is dying a slow death in the German-speaking countries, especially in spoken language where it is being replaced by the dative case. Trotz ihres guten Französisch konnte sie nichts verstehen. small words which replace nouns and establish possession). 2.) Sie ist eines Nachts weggelaufen. Nevertheless, it's important to know about the genitive case because you will still encounter it in writing and you will need to be able to recognize it. Die Kinder deiner Tante “the children of your aunt/your aunt’s children”. The genitive case indicates possession. English grammar uses -’s or the preposition of to show possession. In German, the genitive case serves several functions beyond indicating possession, and, like the Nor is the interrogative wessen (= "whose"). Fränky's Flowers. Germans will often assert that the genitive is disappearing from the language. In grammar, the genitive case (abbreviated gen), is the grammatical case that marks a word, usually a noun, as modifying another word, also usually a noun—thus, indicating an attributive relationship of one noun to the other noun. with the genitive ending still pronounced as "-es." Jesu Christi. When the relationship between two English nouns is defined by one's possession of the other, In colloquial speech Germans often use the preposition von (with the dative, of course) instead of the genitive: This construction with "von" is always used if there is no article to mark the genitive: Uneducated Germans sometimes use the dative and a possessive adjective to create a genitive effect: The accusative case is used to show the direct object of a sentence and after certain prepositions. Another way of saying 'the school's headteacher' in English is 'the headteacher of the school'. How can I identify the genitive case in German? The genitive case is the fourth, final, and least used German case. Indefinite articles in the genitive case (i.e. The genitive case is used to denote ownership. Articles, nouns, pronouns and adjectives have to be declined to reflect the genitive case. In German, the person or thing that possesses is in this case. In normal speech, German often use the dative after trotz and wegen. If the name already ends in "-s" or "-z," then an apostrophe is added:2. It is certainly used less than one or two centuries ago, but it still occupies an important position. the latter) noun: When such a pronoun depends on a preceding noun, desselben or derselben can be employed: Further pronoun examples can be found below. The genitive case pronouns are rarely used in all but the most formal settings. Notice the additional -es at the end of 'Sohn'.